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Cooking From The Heart

Healthy Eating & Living Guide

How to Eat Less Meat

Studies have been showing us for some time now that eating red meat can increase your risk of heart disease, diabetes, and stroke. Meat might be delicious, pair beautifully with a glass of wine, and work with a multitude of recipes, but it’s not the best food product for our health.

What’s more, those who eat less meat or none at all often benefit from a lower risk of heart disease and a healthier body weight. Whether you want to decrease your meat intake or cut it out of your diet altogether, the following information might help.

Become a Bean Lover

Almost any meat dish can become a bean dish with one ingredient swap. Even your favourite tacos, soups, and stews can be equally as delicious with beans as they are with meat. Start small by replacing the meat with beans in your favourite recipes. Play around with different beans like chickpeas, cannellini, and lentils.

You will even grow to love the depth of flavour from a bean-based chilli dish that you may have previously loaded full of beef mince.

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Light Summer Meals Your Family Will Love

The outside temperature can be a deciding factor in the recipes you look for, the food you eat, and even the wine you drink. The warmer it is, the more you seek out light summer meals your family will love.

As the mercury rises, it’s time to get creative in the kitchen. Here are some standout dishes that are light, delicious, and affordable.

Rice Paper Rolls

You often find that many summer recipes are salads. Not everyone wants to eat a salad every day of the week, which means that rice paper rolls can be a refreshing change. You can add all manner of salad ingredients and sauces, not to mention delectable prawns. Prepare them fresh for lunch or dinner, and enjoy how easy they are to make for everyone in the family.

Corn Fritters

Corn fritters, with delicious cheese, like feta, can be a light and tasty meal option for busy families. You can pair them with a side salad and dressing or eat them on their own as a snack with dipping sauce. Corn fritters are also easy to prepare and affordable.

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Filling Material

Which Filling Material Is Best for You?  

Australian men and women have an average of 7-8 fillings, according to the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare. However, if you were to ask any number of those men and women with fillings if they knew what filling material their dentist used, many of them wouldn’t have a clue.

Believe it or not, there is more than one filling material available, and what works for you may not work for someone else. Let your dentist at Joondalup Dentist help you decide, but read on to learn what options the average person has. These may differ from one dental clinic to the next.

The Steps Involved in A Filling

Fillings are a proven treatment method for cavities and cracked and broken teeth. Your dentist will numb the area with local anaesthetic then remove the decayed area with an abrasion instrument, drill, or laser. The tooth is then cleaned of debris and bacteria before a liner is put in to protect your tooth’s nerve.

Each layer of the process undergoes curing to harden the filling material, before the final result is trimmed, shaped, and polished to suit.

Cast Gold Fillings

Cast gold fillings are an option that some dentists and patients consider. They can last for up to 15 years and sometimes even longer, and they can be pleasing on the eye when compared to silver amalgam fillings. They can be a bit more expensive than other filling options, however.

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Food not Good for Teeth

The Food Your Teeth Won’t Thank You for Eating

Oral health and physical health go hand in hand, but we’re probably still more likely to see a doctor regularly than a dentist. We’re probably also more likely to eat food that benefits our overall health, rather than focusing on what looks after our teeth, as well.

Of course, if food is good for your health and skin, then it’s most likely reasonably good for your teeth. Vegetables, in particular, can offer some surprising benefits for teeth health, such as cleaning plaque and freshening breath.

However, are you aware of what foods your teeth won’t thank you for eating? Read on to learn what to stay away from if you want to see your teeth in tip-top shape for your next dentist visit.

Bread

When you started thinking about food that will be bad for your teeth, you were probably thinking about sugar, but did you know that bread is your teeth’s foe, not a friend?

Chewing bread can certainly satiate your hunger, but your saliva breaks down the starches and turns them into sugar. It then sticks in between your teeth and can cause cavities. Fortunately, choosing whole-wheat varieties can limit the impact due to fewer sugars.

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Improve Your Skin

How Eating Well Can Improve Your Skin

Growing old is inevitable. Time will change our skin, and no one is able to avoid age spots and wrinkles. However, how well your skin ages can have a lot to do with your health, sun and sun tanning exposure, chemicals, soaps, and your nutrition.

Nutrients are necessary for your body to shed old cells and replace them with new ones. Without the right nutrients, your skin won’t feel or look as youthful as it possibly could. Before you turn to anti-wrinkle creams, focus on your diet. Here are a few ways in which your diet can improve your skin.

An Apple a Day…

Most people know that old adage of an apple a day keeps the doctor away. That quote can ultimately link to everyone’s need to eat plenty of fruit and vegetables to remain healthy. Not only can you enjoy better health with a diet rich in vegetables and fruit, but better skin as well.

All manner of fruits and vegetables contain antioxidants that prevent cell damage. Carrots, sweet potatoes, spinach, and kale, in particular, promote healthy skin cell development more than most.

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Shrimp and Wine

Serving Up Shrimp – Which Wine Works Well?

As with any seafood, tasting that beautiful ‘sea’ flavour is essential. However, if you go and pair it with a glass of heavy, oaky wine you bought from an online wine retailer, or at a restaurant, you run the risk of merely feeling the food in your mouth. You will lose all connection with the subtle delicacies of the flesh and how the flavour dances on your palate.

Therefore, when it comes to pairing shrimp with wine, you want to treat it like a complex surgery. Every ingredient of your shrimp dish must work well with each undertone of the wine, which can often seem like a challenging and impossible task. Even though it is difficult, it’s certainly not impossible. We aim to offer some classic pairing combinations from your kitchen below.

Vinho Verde

Any Vinho Verde lover will tell you that you don’t need food to drink it because it’s fabulous on its own. While that’s undoubtedly true, this particular wine is a match made in heaven with most shrimp dishes. The best part is – because it’s available in red, white, or rose, you are bound to find one you like – from the first sip to the very last.

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Peach Jam

The Magic of Preserves

For many preserving is classed as one of the dark arts of the kitchen. A mystifying process reserved for those with a supernatural ability to calculate a fruit’s pectin potential by just looking at it. These are people who have the innate ability to mix measured quantities of fruit and sugar in large pots and make the mix miraculously gel. They know the rules, they cast the spells. They collect the resulting concoction in recycled jars with homemade labels to adorn their pantry shelves while they await the inevitable apocalypse, or gift-giving season, whichever comes first.

The truth is, preserving will cast a spell on you. But only once you realize just how easy it is to do. The only magic going on is the simple pleasure of spreading a taste of summer on a piece of toast on a cold, wintery morning. And if you aren’t the kind of family that gets through jar after jar of jam, the feeling of goodwill  as you hand a friend a jar is heartwarming. Homemade always means something more.

Always the pedant, here’s a low-down of the different preserving definitions, just so we are all on the same page. All use the same process which is to heat fruit and sugar which releases pectin, the natural setting agent in fruit.

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Tasty Brownies

Brownies

I had a little trouble deciding whether to include Rocky Road or Brownies in The Design Files chocolate story so I asked Twitter and the responses came back with Rocky Road winning by a narrow margin of just one vote. So I thought it best to include this great little Brownie recipe here so no one misses out.

My allegiance to Rocky Road is high having grown up eating Darrel Lea’s version and Brownies are a relative new-comer having only been exposed to it in its physical form after many visual reference on The Brady Bunch and other American TV shows in the 70s & 80s. There’s a million different Brownie recipes out there. I’m not much of a fan of those that include nuts so when I came across this recipe from Alice Hart’s Alice’s Cook Book gave it a try with stunning results.

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YoGo To Yoghurt

From YoGo To Yoghurt

About as close as I got to yoghurt growing up was the chocolate confection known as YoGo. I remember trying real yoghurt for the first time as an early teen and wondering how there were so many passionate lovers of the stuff given it’s acidy, sour taste. How things change. I persisted and weaned myself off sugars and flavourings to the point where I was more than happy to eat plain yoghurt with a little honey and sliced banana every morning for breakfast. In fact, I was quite addicted to the stuff.

Given I practically live off yoghurt in summer I’m not sure why it’s taken me so long to cotton on to homemade yoghurt. It has to be the most dead simple food to prepare. The best thing is it can be perfectly runny, unlike most commercial yoghurts that add stabilisers, starches, gums and gels to thicken and provide a ‘creamy’ texture. I make my homemade yoghurt is so runny I’ll be using it as a replacement for milk on cereal, which is good news for my granola breakfasts. And good news for people with lactose intolerance. During the fermentation process cultures (Lactobacillus bulgaricus and Streptococcus thermophilus) break down lactose to lactic acid meaning yoghurt is the only dairy food people with lactose intolerance can eat.

 

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